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How would you feel about a constitutional amendment addressing individually armed citizens in the United States...which would allow the Second Amendment to address what it was intended to address...which was and is a well-regulated militia, as proven by the words of President George Washington?


Help us as we work to bring gun control to the United States of America, through our legislative proposal for an "Individual Citizen Arms" constitutional amendment.


Donate below and help us mail this bill to each House of Representatives member, each Senator, President Donald Trump...and others with possible congressional influence, who may support this bill. When the funds have been raised, this bill will be mailed via the United States Post Office, certified mail, with signature confirmation. A petition with the names of the supporters will be mailed along with this bill.


Read Bill #1: Individual Citizen Arms Act Constitutional Amendment / Gun Control Bill



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We believe that a United States constitutional amendment addressing individually armed citizens in the United States is a necessity. The NRA/gun lobby has clearly deceived many Americans concerning the second amendment. The information I have placed below debunks what has been taught by the NRA...and explains the second amendment utilizing irrefutable historical facts. My “Individual Citizen Arms Act” constitutional amendment will work perfectly, while allowing the second amendment to address what it was intended to address...which was and is a well-regulated militia, as proven by the words of President George Washington.

Our thoughts and prayers are with the victims of gun violence and their families. We also offer a possible solution to the problem. Americans deserve the truth about the Second Amendment, and they have received nothing but lies that have resulted in a law. Disseminating the historical facts about the Second Amendment accomplishes several things. It discredits the NRA/gun lobby, as it exposes them as the liars they are, having deceived the American people about the Second Amendment. It also forces House Members, Senators, the President, and United States Supreme Court Justices, to admit Americans have been deceived concerning the Second Amendment. As a result, changes must be made.

I have drafted a constitutional amendment that is ready for Congress. My constitutional amendment is entitled the “Individual Citizen Arms Act,” and it is ready for any congressional changes necessary to obtain ratification by three-fourths of the States. According to the Federal Register at “ https://www.archives.gov/federal-register/constitution,” “The Constitution provides that an amendment may be proposed either by the Congress with a two-thirds majority vote in both the House of Representatives and the Senate or by a constitutional convention called for by two-thirds of the State legislatures.” My Constitutional amendment can be proposed either way, but I am specifically addressing the congressional proposal method. Concerning this method, the Federal Register states, “The Congress proposes an amendment in the form of a joint resolution. Since the President does not have a constitutional role in the amendment process, the joint resolution does not go to the White House for signature or approval.” Further, the Federal Register states, “A proposed amendment becomes part of the Constitution as soon as it is ratified by three-fourths of the States (38 of 50 States). When the OFR verifies that it has received the required number of authenticated ratification documents, it drafts a formal proclamation for the Archivist to certify that the amendment is valid and has become part of the Constitution. This certification is published in the Federal Register and U.S. Statutes at Large and serves as official notice to the Congress and to the Nation that the amendment process has been completed.”

My “Individual Citizen Arms Act” constitutional amendment should be addressed by Congress immediately. I look forward to hearing that my “Individual Citizen Arms Act” constitutional amendment will be placed on the floor for congressional approval...followed with ratification by three-fourths of the states...ultimately becoming part of the United States Constitution. A constitutional amendment is not an easy task, but it is possible.

Concerning the irrefutable historical facts about the Second Amendment. Pro-gun facets of society have lied about President George Washington, and many people have bought into the lie, and repeated it out of ignorance of President George Washington's first annual address to Congress. Pro-gun facets of society lie about President George Washington when they say he stated, "A free people should be armed to guard against government tyranny." President George Washington did not state this. In his first annual address to Congress on January 8, 1790, President George Washington stated the following:

"Among the many interesting objects, which will engage your attention, that of providing for the common defence will merit particular regard. To be prepared for war is one of the most effectual means of preserving peace.

A free people ought not only to be armed but disciplined; to which end a Uniform and well digested plan is requisite: And their safety and interest require that they should promote such manufactories, as tend to render them independent on others, for essential, particularly for military supplies.

The proper establishment of the Troops which may be deemed indispensible, will be entitled to mature consideration. In the arrangements which may be made respecting it, it will be of importance to conciliate the comfortable support of the Officers and Soldiers with a due regard to economy.

There was reason to hope, that the pacific measures adopted with regard to certain hostile tribes of Indians would have relieved the inhabitants of our Southern and Western frontiers from their depredations. But you will percieve, from the information contained in the papers, which I shall direct to be laid before you (comprehending a communication from the Commonwealth of Virginia) that we ought to be prepared to afford protection to those parts of the Union; and, if necessary, to punish aggressors.

The interests of the United States require, that our intercourse with other nations should be facilitated by such provisions as will enable me to fulfil my duty in that respect, in the manner, which circumstances may render most conducive to the public good: And to this end, that the compensations to be made to the persons, who may be employed, should, according to the nature of their appointments, be defined by law; and a competent fund designated for defraying the expenses incident to the conduct of foreign affairs."

President George Washington was speaking about providing for the common defense. Washington specifically wanted some necessary troops, and a well-organized/well-regulated militia available during peacetime. The militia is organized/regulated by the United States government. Proof of Washington's feelings in this matter is backed up by George Washington's, sentiments on a peace establishment, written May 2, 1793, and reads as follows:

“A Peace Establishment for the United States of America may in my opinion be classed under four different heads Vizt:

First. A regular and standing force, for Garrisoning West Point and such other Posts upon our Northern, Western, and Southern Frontiers, as shall be deemed necessary to awe the Indians, protect our Trade, prevent the encroachment of our Neighbours of Canada and the Florida's, and guard us at least from surprizes; Also for security of our Magazines.

Secondly. A well organized Militia; upon a Plan that will pervade all the States, and introduce similarity in their Establishment Manoeuvres, Exercise and Arms.

Thirdly. Establishing Arsenals of all kinds of Military Stores.

Fourthly. Accademies, one or more for the Instruction of the Art Military; particularly those Branches of it which respect Engineering and Artillery, which are highly essential, and the knowledge of which, is most difficult to obtain. Also Manufactories of some kinds of Military Stores.

Upon each of these, and in the order in which they stand, I shall give my sentiments as concisely as I can, and with that freedom which the Committee have authorized.

Altho' a large standing Army in time of Peace hath ever been considered dangerous to the liberties of a Country, yet a few Troops, under certain circumstances, are not only safe, but indispensably necessary. Fortunately for us our relative situation requires but few. The same circumstances which so effectually retarded, and in the end conspired to defeat the attempts of Britain to subdue us, will now powerfully tend to render us secure. Our distance from the European States in a great degree frees us of apprehension, from their numerous regular forces and the Insults and dangers which are to be dreaded from their Ambition.

But, if our danger from those powers was more imminent, yet we are too poor to maintain a standing Army adequate to our defence, and was our Country more populous and rich, still it could not be done without great oppression of the people. Besides, as soon as we are able to raise funds more than adequate to the discharge of the Debts incurred by the Revolution, it may become a Question worthy of consideration, whether the surplus should not be applied in preparations for building and equipping a Navy, without which, in case of War we could neither protect our Commerce, nor yield that Assistance to each other, which, on such an extent of Sea-Coast, our mutual Safety would require.

Were it not totally unnecessary and superfluous to adduce arguments to prove what is conceded on all hands the Policy and expediency of resting the protection of the Country on a respectable and well established Militia, we might not only shew the propriety of the measure from our peculiar local situation, but we might have recourse to the Histories of Greece and Rome in their most virtuous and Patriotic ages to demonstrate the Utility of such Establishments. Then passing by the Mercinary Armies, which have at one time or another subverted the liberties of all-most all the Countries they have been raised to defend, we might see, with admiration, the Freedom and Independence of Switzerland supported for Centuries, in the midst of powerful and jealous neighbours, by means of a hardy and well organized Militia. We might also derive useful lessons of a similar kind from other Nations of Europe, but I believe it will be found, the People of this Continent are too well acquainted with the Merits of the subject to require information or example. I shall therefore proceed to point out some general outlines of their duty, and conclude this head with a few particular observations on the regulations which I conceive ought to be immediately adopted by the States at the instance and recommendation of Congress.

It may be laid down as a primary position, and the basis of our system, that every Citizen who enjoys the protection of a free Government, owes not only a proportion of his property, but even of his personal services to the defence of it, and consequently that the Citizens of America (with a few legal and official exceptions) from 18 to 50 Years of Age should be borne on the Militia Rolls, provided with uniform Arms, and so far accustomed to the use of them, that the Total strength of the Country might be called forth at a Short Notice on any very interesting Emergency, for these purposes they ought to be duly organized into Commands of the same formation; (it is not of very great importance, whether the Regiments are large or small, provided a sameness prevails in the strength and composition of them and I do not know that a better establishment, than that under which the Continental Troops now are, can be adopted. They ought to be regularly Mustered and trained, and to have their Arms and Accoutrements inspected at certain appointed times, not less than once or twice in the course of every [year] but as it is obvious, amongst such a Multitude of People (who may indeed be useful for temporary service) there must be a great number, who from domestic Circumstances, bodily defects, natural awkwardness or disinclination, can never acquire the habits of Soldiers; but on the contrary will injure the appearance of any body of Troops to which they are attached, and as there are a sufficient proportion of able bodied young Men, between the Age of 18 and 25, who, from a natural fondness for Military parade (which passion is almost ever prevalent at that period of life) might easily be enlisted or drafted to form a Corps in every State, capable of resisting any sudden impression which might be attempted by a foreign Enemy, while the remainder of the National forces would have time to Assemble and make preparations for the Field. I would wish therefore, that the former, being considered as a denier resort, reserved for some great occasion, a judicious system might be adopted for forming and placing the latter on the best possible Establishment. And that while the Men of this description shall be viewed as the Van and flower of the American Forces, ever ready for Action and zealous to be employed whenever it may become necessary in the service of their Country; they should meet with such exemptions, privileges or distinctions, as might tend to keep alive a true Military pride, a nice sense of honour, and a patriotic regard for the public. Such sentiments, indeed, ought to be instilled into our Youth, with their earliest years, to be cherished and inculcated as frequently and forcibly as possible.

It is not for me to decide positively, whether it will be ultimately most interesting to the happiness and safety of the United States, to form this Class of Soldiers into a kind of Continental Militia, selecting every 10th 15th or 20th. Man from the Rolls of each State for the purpose; Organizing, Officering and Commissioning those Corps upon the same principle as is now practiced in the Continental Army. Whether it will be best to comprehend in this body, all the Men fit for service between some given Age and no others, for example between 18 and 25 or some similar description, or whether it will be preferable in every Regiment of the proposed Establishment to have one additional Company inlisted or drafted from the best Men for 3, 5, or 7 years and distinguished by the name of the additional or light Infantry Company, always to be kept complete. The Companies might then be drawn together occasionally and formed into particular Battalions or Regiments under Field Officers appointed for that Service. One or other of these plans I think will be found indispensably necessary, if we are in earnest to have an efficient force ready for Action at a moments Warning. And I cannot conceal my private sentiment, that the formation of additional, or light Companies will be most consistent with the genius of our Countrymen and perhaps in their opinion most consonant to the spirit of our Constitution.

I shall not contend for names or forms, it will be altogether essential, and it will be sufficient that perfect Uniformity should be established throughout the Continent, and pervade, as far as possible, every Corps, whether of standing Troops or Militia, and of whatever denomination they may be. To avoid the confusion of a contrary practice, and to produce the happy consequences which will attend a uniform system of Service, in case Troops from the different parts of the Continent shall ever be brought to Act together again, I would beg leave to propose, that Congress should employ some able hand, to digest a Code of Military Rules and regulations, calculated immediately for the Militia and other Troops of the United States; And as it should seem the present system, by being a little simplified, altered, and improved, might be very well adopted to the purpose; I would take the liberty of recommending, that measures should be immediately taken for the accomplishment of this interesting business, and that an Inspector General should be appointed to superintend the execution of the proposed regulations in the several States.”

Now, here's the entire text of President George Washington's first annual address to Congress - January 8, 1790:

“Fellow Citizens of the Senate, and House of Representatives.

I embrace with great satisfaction the opportunity, which now presents itself, of congratulating you on the present favourable prospects of our public affairs. The recent accession of the important State of North Carolina to the Constitution of the United States (of which official information has been recieved)—the rising credit and respectability of our Country—the general and increasing good will towards the Government of the Union—and the concord, peace and plenty, with which we are blessed, are circumstances, auspicious, in an eminent degree to our national prosperity.

In resuming your consultations for the general good, you cannot but derive encouragement from the reflection, that the measures of the last Session have been as satisfactory to your Constituents, as the novelty and difficulty of the work allowed you to hope. Still further to realize their expectations, and to secure the blessings which a Gracious Providence has placed within our reach, will in the course of the present important Session, call for the cool and deliberate exertion of your patriotism, firmness and wisdom.

Among the many interesting objects, which will engage your attention, that of providing for the common defence will merit particular regard. To be prepared for war is one of the most effectual means of preserving peace.

A free people ought not only to be armed but disciplined; to which end a Uniform and well digested plan is requisite: And their safety and interest require that they should promote such manufactories, as tend to render them independent on others, for essential, particularly for military supplies.

The proper establishment of the Troops which may be deemed indispensible, will be entitled to mature consideration. In the arrangements which may be made respecting it, it will be of importance to conciliate the comfortable support of the Officers and Soldiers with a due regard to economy.

There was reason to hope, that the pacific measures adopted with regard to certain hostile tribes of Indians would have relieved the inhabitants of our Southern and Western frontiers from their depredations. But you will percieve, from the information contained in the papers, which I shall direct to be laid before you (comprehending a communication from the Commonwealth of Virginia) that we ought to be prepared to afford protection to those parts of the Union; and, if necessary, to punish aggressors.

The interests of the United States require, that our intercourse with other nations should be facilitated by such provisions as will enable me to fulfil my duty in that respect, in the manner, which circumstances may render most conducive to the public good: And to this end, that the compensations to be made to the persons, who may be employed, should, according to the nature of their appointments, be defined by law; and a competent fund designated for defraying the expenses incident to the conduct of foreign affairs.

Various considerations also render it expedient, that the terms on which foreigners may be admitted to the rights of Citizens, should be speedily ascertained by a uniform rule of naturalization.

Uniformity in the Currency, Weights and Measures of the United States is an object of great importance, and will, I am persuaded, be duly attended to.

The advancement of Agriculture, commerce and Manufactures, by all proper means, will not, I trust, need recommendation. But I cannot forbear intimating to you the expediency of giving effectual encouragement as well to the introduction of new and useful inventions from abroad, as to the exertions of skill and genius in producing them at home; and of facilitating the intercourse between the distant parts of our Country by a due attention to the Post-Office and Post Roads.

Nor am I less pursuaded, that you will agree with me in opinion, that there is nothing, which can better deserve your patronage, than the promotion of Science and Literature. Knowledge is in every Country the surest basis of public happiness. In one, in which the measures of Government recieve their impression so immediately from the sense of the Community as in our’s, it is proportionably essential. To the security of a free Constitution it contributes in various ways: By convincing those, who are entrusted with the public administration, that every valuable end of Government is best answered by the enlightened confidence of the people: And by teaching the people themselves to know and to value their own rights; to discern and provide against invasions of them; to distinguish between oppression and the necessary exercise of lawful authority; between burthens proceeding from a disregard to their convenience and those resulting from the inevitable exigencies of Society; to discriminate the spirit of liberty from that of licentiousness, cherishing the first, avoiding the last, and uniting a speedy, but temperate vigilence against encroachments, with an inviolable respect to the laws.

Whether this desirable object will be best promoted by affording aids to Seminaries of Learning already established—by the institution of a national University—or by any other expedients, will be well worthy of a place in the deliberations of the Legislature.

GENTLEMEN OF THE HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES.

I saw with peculiar pleasure, at the close of the last Session, the resolution entered into by you expressive of your opinion, that an adequate provision for the support of the public Credit is a matter of high importance to the national honor and prosperity. In this sentiment, I entirely concur. And to a perfect confidence in your best endeavours to divise such a provision, as will be truly consistent with the end, I add an equal reliance on the chearful co-operation of the othe[r] branch of the Legislature. It would be superfluous to specify inducements to a measure in which the character and permanent interests of the United States are so obviously and so deeply concerned; and which has recieved so explicit a sanction from your declaration.

GENTLEMEN OF THE SENATE AND HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES.

I have directed the proper Officers to lay before you respectively such papers and estimates as regard the affairs particularly recommended to your consideration, and necessary to convey to you that information of the state of the Union, which it is my duty to afford.

The welfare of our Country is the great object to which our cares and efforts ought to be directed. And I shall derive great satisfaction from a co-operation with you, in the pleasing though arduous task of ensuring to our fellow Citizens the blessings, which they have a right to expect, from a free, efficient and equal Government.”

I placed the entire text of President George Washington's first annual address to Congress on January 8, 1790, because I want you to pay particular attention to how President George Washington outlines what a free constitution does for those who are entrusted with the public administration, and what it teaches and provides for the people themselves. The United States Constitution was framed to address each of these issues outlined by President George Washington within the confines of law...and has nothing to do with people rising-up against the United States government with arms. The text of the speech says it all.

The Militia Acts of 1792 prove a well-regulated militia to provide for the common defense...as written in the Preamble, Article One Section Eight, Article Two Section Two, and the Second Amendment to the United States Constitution. The Militia Acts, May 8, 1792: “An Act more effectually to provide for the National Defence by establishing an Uniform Militia throughout the United States.” Section One reads as follows:

Section 1.

“Section 1. Be it enacted by the Senate and House of Representatives of the United States of America in Congress assembled, That each and every free able-bodied white male citizen of the respective states, resident therein, who is or shall be of the age of eighteen years, and under the age of forty-five years (except as is herein after excepted) shall severally and respectively be enrolled in the militia by the captain or commanding officer of the company, within whose bounds such citizen shall reside, and that within twelve months after the passing of this act. And it shall at all times hereafter be the duty of every such captain or commanding officer of a company to enrol every such citizen, as aforesaid, and also those who shall, from time to time, arrive at the age of eighteen years, or being of the age of eighteen years and under the age of forty-five years (except as before excepted) shall come to reside within his bounds; and shall without delay notify such citizen of the said enrolment, by a proper non-commissioned officer of the company, by whom such notice may be proved. That every citizen so enrolled and notified, shall, within six months thereafter, provide himself with a good musket or firelock, a sufficient bayonet and belt, two spare flints, and a knapsack, a pouch with a box therein to contain not less than twenty-four cartridges, suited to the bore of his musket or firelock, each cartridge to contain a proper quantity of powder and ball: or with a good rifle, knapsack, shot-pouch and powder-horn, twenty balls suited to the bore of his rifle, and a quarter of a pound of powder; and shall appear, so armed, accoutred and provided, when called out to exercise, or into service, except, that when called out on company days to exercise only, he may appear without a knapsack. That the commissioned officers shall severally be armed with a sword or hanger and espontoon, and that from and after five years from the passing of this act, all muskets for arming the militia as herein required, shall be of bores sufficient for balls of the eighteenth part of a pound. And every citizen so enrolled, and providing himself with the arms, ammunition and accoutrements required as aforesaid, shall hold the same exempted from all suits, distresses, executions or sales, for debt or for the payment of taxes.”

As written in section one of the Militia Acts of 1792, only free able bodied white male citizens were enrolled in the militia, as proven in the text above.

President George Washington addressed providing for the common defense, which is accomplished through the United States government. Concerning the militia, the United States government regulates the militia as provided for in Article 1 Section 8, Article 2 Section 2, and the Second Amendment.

Article 1 Section 8 reads as follows:

[The Congress shall have the power

1. To lay and collect taxes, duties, imposts and excises, to pay the debts and provide for the common defence and general welfare of the United States; but all duties, imposts and excises shall be uniform throughout the United States:

2. To borrow money on the credit of the United States:

3. To regulate commerce with foreign nations, and among the several states, and with the Indian tribes:

4. To establish an uniform rule of naturalization, and uniform laws on the subject of bankruptcies throughout the United States:

5. To coin money, regulate the value thereof, and of foreign coin, and fix the standard of weights and measures:

6. To provide for the punishment of counterfeiting the securities and current coin of the United States:

7. To establish post-offices and post-roads:

8. To promote the progress of science and useful arts, by securing for limited times to authors and inventors the exclusive right to their respective writings and discoveries:

9. To constitute tribunals inferior to the supreme court:

10. To define and punish piracies and felonies committed on the high seas, and offences against the law of nations:

11. To declare war, grant letters of marque and reprisal, and make rules concerning captures on land and water:

12. To raise and support armies, but no appropriation of money to that use shall be for a longer term than two years:

13. To provide and maintain a navy:

14. To make rules for the government and regulation of the land and naval forces:

15. To provide for calling forth the militia to execute the laws of the union, suppress insurrections and repel invasions:

16. To provide for organizing, arming and disciplining the militia, and for governing such part of them as may be employed in the service of the United States, reserving to the states respectively, the appointment of the officers, and the authority of training the militia according to the discipline prescribed by Congress:

17. To exercise exclusive legislation in all cases whatsoever, over such district (not exceeding ten miles square) as may, by cession of particular states, and the acceptance of Congress, become the seat of the government of the United States, and to exercise like authority over all places purchased by the consent of the legislature of the state in which the same shall be, for the erection of forts, magazines, arsenals, dock-yards, and other needful buildings: And,

18. To make all laws which shall be necessary and proper for carrying into execution the foregoing powers, and all other powers vested by this constitution in the government of the United States, or in any department or officer thereof.]

Article 2 Section 2 reads as follows:

[The President shall be commander in chief of the Army and Navy of the United States, and of the militia of the several states, when called into the actual service of the United States; he may require the opinion, in writing, of the principal officer in each of the executive departments, upon any subject relating to the duties of their respective offices, and he shall have power to grant reprieves and pardons for offenses against the United States, except in cases of impeachment.

He shall have power, by and with the advice and consent of the Senate, to make treaties, provided two thirds of the Senators present concur; and he shall nominate, and by and with the advice and consent of the Senate, shall appoint ambassadors, other public ministers and consuls, judges of the Supreme Court, and all other officers of the United States, whose appointments are not herein otherwise provided for, and which shall be established by law: but the Congress may by law vest the appointment of such inferior officers, as they think proper, in the President alone, in the courts of law, or in the heads of departments.

The President shall have power to fill up all vacancies that may happen during the recess of the Senate, by granting commissions which shall expire at the end of their next session.]

The Second Amendment reads as follows:

“A well-regulated Militia, being necessary to the security of a free State, the right of the people to keep and bear Arms shall not be infringed.”

The militia is a well-organized/well-regulated militia, regulated by the United States government as outlined in Article 1 Section 8, Article 2 Section 2, and the Second Amendment. None of these so-called militias that exist today are militias according to the United States Constitution. The United States government forms and regulates militias. A group of people forming what they call a militia is not a militia according to the United States Constitution, and the media should be ashamed for calling these groups militia on national television, when they are not militia according to the United States Constitution.

The "rise-up with arms against a tyrannical government" lie repeated by pro-gun facets of society, is just that. It is a lie that is not true in any way, shape, or form. The NRA/gun lobby has deceived Americans for years, but their time of deceiving the American people is over, as the American people now know the truth about the Second Amendment.

Concerning the “rise-up with arms against a tyrannical government" lie repeated by pro-gun facets of society. Rising-up against the United States government has been attempted in the past during the administration of President George Washington, and it was suppressed by the administration of President George Washington. Some of the people in the administration of President George Washington were: Thomas Jefferson who headed the Department of State, Alexander Hamilton who headed the Department of the Treasury, and Edmund Randolph who was the first Attorney General. President George Washington utilized these men for policy advice, as this was President George Washington’s “Cabinet.”

Alexander Hamilton put forth a plan to charter a bank of the United States, and deal with the national debt by utilizing a federal excise tax that would be placed on spirits, wine, coffee, and tea. Congress passed Hamilton’s federal excise tax plan in April 1791. This resulted in people rising-up against the United States government in an insurrection known historically as the “Whiskey Rebellion,” because the people did not agree with the federal excise taxes. The Whiskey Rebels had the same mindset that pro-gun facets of society have today, and they undoubtedly believed the government had grown tyrannical. The government the Whiskey Rebels chose to levy war against contained founding fathers and this is a historical fact. President George Washington stated that amnesty would be given to the people who would support the government, and prison for the people who would not. President George Washington had the constitutional authority of Article 1 Section 8, Article 2 Section 2, Article 3 Section 3, and the Second Amendment, when he suppressed the insurrection known historically as the “Whiskey Rebellion.” Article 3 Section 3 of the Constitution of the United States of America reads as follows:

“Treason against the United States, shall consist only in levying War against them, or in adhering to their Enemies, giving them Aid and Comfort. No Person shall be convicted of Treason unless on the Testimony of two Witnesses to the same overt Act, or on Confession in open Court. The Congress shall have power to declare the Punishment of Treason, but no Attainder of Treason shall work Corruption of Blood, or Forfeiture except during the Life of the person attainted.”

The outcome of the insurrection known historically as the “Whiskey Rebellion” resulted in two of the insurrectionists being convicted of treason and sentenced to hang, but President George Washington pardoned both convicts because they were mentally unstable. Remember, this happened after the Second Amendment was adopted. President George Washington had the constitutional authority of Article 1 Section 8, Article 2 Section 2, Article 3 Section 3, and the Second Amendment, when he suppressed the insurrection known historically as the “Whiskey Rebellion.” The “Whiskey Rebellion” was an insurrection and an example of treason…and it is also proof of what happens to insurrectionists who levy war against the United States. Pro-gun facets of society today who are insurrectionists who feel they can levy war against the United States government, undoubtedly have the same mindset as the insurrectionists in the Whiskey Rebellion, which was suppressed by the United States government under the leadership of President George Washington, after the Second Amendment was adopted.

Pro-gun facets of society endorse treason when they speak words of insurrection. Nobody…and specifically, nobody working for the United States government, should speak words of insurrection concerning the Second Amendment. People who hold to the insurrectionist interpretation of the Second Amendment are clearly wrong when they speak words of insurrection, by stating the Second Amendment gives them the right to bear arms to rise-up against a tyrannical government. The Constitution clearly addresses United States government personnel who engage in insurrection or rebellion against the United States, in Section Three of the Fourteenth Amendment to the Constitution of the United States, which reads as follows:

“No person shall be a Senator or Representative in Congress, or elector of President and Vice-President, or hold any office, civil or military, under the United States, or under any state, who, having previously taken an oath, as a member of Congress, or as an officer of the United States, or as a member of any State Legislature, or as an executive or judicial officer of any state, to support the Constitution of the United States, shall have engaged in insurrection or rebellion against the same, or given aid or comfort to the enemies thereof. But Congress may by a vote of two-thirds of each House remove such disability.”

The Constitution clearly states United States government personnel who engage in insurrection or rebellion against the United States, may be removed from office by a vote of two-thirds of each house. Speaking words of insurrection is not good in any way, shape, or form. The First Amendment provides the Constitutional way to petition the government for a redress of grievances.

The Second Amendment does not support the insurrectionist mindset of pro-gun facets of society, as the Second Amendment is not for rising-up against the United States government with arms. The United States Constitution was framed against insurrections, as one can clearly see by reading through the Constitution… but pro-gun facets of society have been successful in indoctrinating some into their insurrectionist interpretation of the Second Amendment, even though the United States Constitution is clearly against insurrections…and there are severe consequences for those involved in insurrections, as levying war against the United States government is treason, as clearly outlined in Article 3 Section 3.

The United States Constitution was framed to form a more perfect union, not to establish mass confusion.

We thank you for your time.

Reference

National Archives https://www.archives.gov/faqs In general, all government records are in the public domain and may be freely used.

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Listen to the following audio clip to hear some historical facts about the Second Amendment.

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